Hard Maple question

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Sven-Olof Jansson 2 weeks, 2 days ago.

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  • #585430

    Matthew Newman
    Participant

    I was at a local hardwood supplier and found some very cool looking hard Maple. Is there a term or name for what happened here? Also is it food safe for use as a cutting board? I primarily got it to make a cribbage board but will have enough for two or a cool looking cutting board but want to verify first.

    Thanks,
    Matt Newman

    Attachments:
    #585448

    Harvey Kimsey
    Participant

    I am not sure but that resembles spalting, which is common in maple.

    #585459

    Matthew Newman
    Participant

    Spalting was the term I was thinking of, since it’s fungus related I might skip the cutting board idea just to be on the safe side I’ve got plenty of other ideas for it.

    #585464

    Larry Geib
    Participant

    It is highly prized for door/drawer fronts.

    Dry it so the spalting does not continue.
    And be careful with dust from salted wood.

    FWW discusión on spalting and food.
    https://www.finewoodworking.com/forum/spalted-wood-food-safe

    #585475

    Matthew Newman
    Participant

    It’s supposed to already be kiln dried so that shouldn’t be a problem. I’d be fine using it for food related stuff but would rather not have a guest or family member find out how spalting happens and get worked up about it

    -Matt

    #585652

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    This wood figure is the consequence of fungi (actually mushrooms) breaking down the lignin in the wood, which makes spalted wood far less resistant to moisture and, in particular, microbials. As moisture content and microbes tend to be high in most foods, spalted maple is probably not ideal for a cutting board.

    The fungi behind white rot use fruit bodies to spread their spores, so, in contrast to moulds and yeasts, the spore content in the wood should be low, which of course does not absolve the dust from spalted wood in any other way.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Cambridge, MA

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